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11 Types of Creative Writing

 

Colored Pencils Border, and Creativity write isolated

Colored Pencils Border, and Creativity write isolated

What is creative writing? What does it mean to be a creative writer? We often associate creative writing with fictional stories, but there are many more ways of being creative as a writer than this. Here are just a few examples of the different types of creative writing that are available for you to explore.

#1. Essays

Writing an essay requires creative thinking. This is especially true for personal or descriptive essays. If you’re trying to create a persuasive argument for the reader, then you’ll need to engage the creative centers of your mind to make that happen.

#2. Journals

A journal is not quite the same as a diary. Diaries help you keep track of the events that happen to you during the day. A journal takes on more of a memoir role. You can choose the types of memories that you write down by keeping everything within a specific topic or heading. Dreams are a common journal, but you could also focus on relationships, contentment, gratitude, or virtually any other emotion.

#3. Poetry

Poetry might not be a form of creative writing that hits bestseller lists often, but it shouldn’t be ignored by any writer. Poems can be written in any format. You can also write them with specific form and prose if you prefer. If you really want to stretch your creative energies, try to come up with a rhyming story – kids love stories that rhyme. For fun, you could even create a horror rhyming poem for adults to practice your creative skills.

#4. Vignettes

These are short stories that can take on virtually any format that is offered here. Pretty much anything goes from a creative standpoint if you’re writing a vignette – except for length. This type of creative writing is extremely short. It can even just be a couple of sentences long if you wish, as long as the descriptions used are evocative.

#5. Short Stories

A short story has natural ABC progression which allows you to tell a full tale that is meaningful to the reader. These stories don’t have to be lengthy either. You can write a solid short story in 1,000-2,000 words and still include character development and plot details.

#6. Letters

Our ability to communicate with one another is relying more and more on the written word these days, so writing letters to someone is a great creative writing skill to develop. You can even have your characters write letters to each other within the context of a story you’re creating.

#7. Songs

Some might say that song lyrics are really just a poem set to music, but there is a certain rhythm to song lyrics that is unique to the writing world. If you can play an instrument or like to sing, then consider stretching your creative writing skills into this type of writing to see what happens. If you don’t play an instrument, maybe someone you know does and would be interested in coming up with a collaboration.

#8. Blogging

Think of blogging as a published form of journaling, but without the limitation of purpose. A blog can be a personal diary, a reflection of a spiritual journey, or even be educational in nature.

#9. Free Writing

This might be the most creative type of writing. Just turn on your computer or open up a notebook and start to write. Don’t let anything stop you. Whatever comes to mind gets put onto your screen or that page. Nothing is off-limits. Set a time limit for yourself – say 15 minutes. When you’ve finished, you may have several great ideas that can be turned into larger stories later on.

#10. Reporting

Journalists tends to follow this type of creative writing most often, especially when writing a column or opinion piece. Some journalistic writing only reports facts, events, and actions, but even then there is a certain creative element to the writing that makes it compelling. If you’ve ever read a local article about a city council meeting, then you’ve seen a reporter being creative with some very dry content so it could be interesting.

#11. Speeches

Speeches are a lot like essays, but the goal of a speech tends to be more persuasive or inspirational. The good news about this creative writing type is that virtually any subject matter can be discussed. You do have limits on length in this format – about 100 words can be spoken clearly per minute, so be precise with your key points so a rambling speech isn’t the end result.

These types of creative writing may be some of the most popular ways to write, but that doesn’t mean they’re the only ones that are available. You can write memoirs. You can write autobiographies. You can write TV scripts. The goal is simple: to just keep writing. Find your comfort zone, then step outside of it, and your creative energies will thank you for your efforts.

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What’s your favorite type of creative writing and why? Share with me on my contact page and if I use your idea, I’ll give you credit and link to your site!

 

 

Melissa G Wilson

Melissa has been a leader in the book writing, publishing and marketing arena for the past two decades. To date, she has helped more than 100 thought leaders write, publish and market their books. Her clients include executives such as Dan Weinfurter a seven-time Inc 500 winner and Orlando Ashford, President of Holland Cruise Lines.

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